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86th Legislature Bill Tracker



Quick Links:
Allied Health Providers (AHP) • AHP – Chiropractors • AHP – Optometry • AHP – Physical Therapists • AHP – Podiatry
Commercial Insurance (CI) – Network • CI – Out of Network • CI – State Health Plans
Facilities – Freestanding Emergency Care Centers • Facilities – Hospitals & ASCs
Hospitals: Local Provider Participation Funds (LPPFs) • Medical Lawsuits • Patient Bad Debt • Pharmacy Issues
Physician Licensing • Prescription Monitoring Program & Controlled Substances • Pricing Transparency
Public Health •  Sports Medicine • Telemedicine • Trauma • Workers’ Comp


Allied Health Providers

SB 1743 – Sen. Jose Menendez (D-San Antonio) and HB 4412 – Rep. JD Sheffield, DO (R-Gatesville) – The bill would require surgical assistants to become licensed by a certain date. The current law allows unlicensed surgical assistants to work under a surgeon’s delegation. PAs, NPs, and other licensed professionals would not be affected. The bill did not make it out of a House committee hearing.

HB 278 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) – For physicians who have a prescriptive authority agreement with a physician assistant and/or advanced practice registered nurse, streamlines requirements by: • removing existing requirement for face-to-face meetings between a physician and a physician assistant (PA) or advanced practice registered nurse (APRN); and • requiring meetings to take place once a month in a manner determined by the physician and the PA or APRN. The bill was signed into law.

SB 270 – Sen. Jose Rodriguez (D-El Paso) – The bill would give some forms of independent practice to advance practice nurses veterans who served as advanced practice nurses in active duty. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 927 – Rep. James White (R-Hillister) – The bill would give advanced practice nurses independent practice in certain rural counties. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 1092 – Rep. Bill Zedler (R-Arlington) and SB 268 – Sen. Jose Rodriguez (D-El Paso) – The bill would give prescriptive authority to certain psychologists. HB 1092 received a subcommittee hearing, but it did not receive a vote.

HB 1683 – Rep. Matt Shaheen (R-Plano) and SB 1628 – Sen. Judith Zaffirini (D-Laredo) – The bill would abolish the regulation of orthotic and prosthetic technicians due to the low number of certificate holders. HB 1683 was amended to HB 2847, which was signed into law.

HB 1748 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) and SB 1239 Sen. Nathan Johnson (D-Dallas) – The bill would require surgical technologists to submit their evidence of completion of continuing education to the health care facility. This would require the surgical technologist to complete 30 hours every two years. This bill differs from those that were introduced in that the burden would be on the surgical tech, not the facility. SB 1239 was signed into law.

HB 1792 – Rep. Stephanie Klick (R-Fort Worth) – The bill has over 28 co-authors and co-sponsors and would give independent practice to APRNs after a certain time period of supervised practice. The bill received a subcommittee hearing, but it did not receive a vote.

HB 1827 – Rep. Donna Howard (D-Austin) and SB 835 – Sen. Borris Miles (D-Houston) – The bill would allow pharmacists to prescribe medicine following a positive flu test. Current law does not allow a pharmacist to administer drugs. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 1863 – Rep. Stephanie Klick (R-Fort Worth) and SB 2379 – Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola) – The bill would direct the Texas Board of Nursing to adopt rules governing the administration of anesthesia by a CRNA on the order of a dentist. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 924 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) and HB 3878 – Rep. Lynn Stucky (R-Denton) – The bill would create a license for anesthesiologist assistant. HB 3878 received a subcommittee hearing, but it did not receive a committee vote.

HB 2610 – Rep. Stan Lambert (R-Abilene) – The bill would create expedited licensing procedures for certain nurses who are military spouses. The bill was voted out of the House, but it did not make it out of the Senate.

SB 1200 – Sen. Donna Campbell, MD (R-New Braunfels) – The bill would direct Texas agencies to recognize certain out-of-state licenses for military spouses if the other state has similar licensing requirements. The bill was voted out o the Senate on 04.30.19.

HB 3128 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would add physician assistants and nurse practitioners who are working under a physician’s delegation and supervision to perform return-to-play protocol services for students who have been removed from interscholastic activity on the basis of a suspected concussion. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 3194 – Rep. Gene Wu (D-Houston) – The bill relates to the growing number of providers who are attempting to perform acupuncture (chiropractors). The bill would limit the number of individuals who would be able to perform acupuncture and the recommendation of dietary guidelines to state law. The bill received a subcommittee hearing, but it did not receive a vote.

HB 2907 – Rep. Drew Darby (R-San Angelo) – The bill would allow a physician to delegate the reading and interpretation of radiological studies by an APRN. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4066 – Rep. Michelle Beckley (D-Carrollton) – The bill would repeal the provision that prohibits a physician assistant from serving as a governing person or officer of certain business entities (physician practices). The bill was voted out of committee, but it was not placed on the House’s calendar for a full House vote.

SB 2011 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) – The bill would direct the state of Texas to “conduct a study regarding the feasibility of developing a pilot program to streamline the requirements for a nurse to become eligible under Chapter 155, Occupations Code, for a license to practice medicine. The bill was signed into law.

HB 4418 – Rep. Jonathan Stickland (R-Bedford) – The bill would all a nurse practitioner to sign a student’s certificate that would exempt the student from immunization. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 2438 – Sen. Jose Rodriguez (D-El Paso) – The bill would provide independent practice to nurse practitioners after they have completed 1,000 hours under a physician’s delegation. This is similar to HB 1792. SB 2438 did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 1995 – Sen. Brian Birdwell (R-Granbury) – The bill would give the governor authority to have final say over regulations passed by regulatory bodies through a new regulatory body that the governor would manage. The bill was signed into law.


Allied Health Providers – Chiropractors

HB 2869 – Rep. Richard Raymond (D-Laredo) – The bill would allow chiropractors to provide acupuncture services. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 2733 – Rep. Phil Stephenson (R-Wharton) and Rep. Richard Raymond (D-Laredo) and SB 1867 – Sen. Chuy Hinojosa (D-McAllen) – The bill would define “neuromusculoskeletal system” as consisting of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems for the purpose of defining the chiropractors’ scope of practice. The House and Senate committees held hearings, however, they did not vote.

HB 1410 – Rep. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) and SB 1739 – Sen. Jose Menendez (D-San Antonio) – The bill would prohibit an HMO, PPO, or EPO from not paying a chiropractor for a service that is within the scope of practice of the chiropractor. SB 1739 was signed into law.


Allied Health Providers – Optometry

HB 1798 – Rep. Craig Goldman (R-Fort Worth) and SB 1223 – Sen. Chuy Hinojosa (D-McAllen) – The bill would give optometrists the ability to perform surgery, prescribe Schedule II drugs, and independently manage glaucoma. Rep. Dade Phelan (R-Beaumont) and Rep. Eddie Rodriguez (D-Austin) are the other co-authors. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 3505 – Rep. Gary VanDeaver (R-New Boston) – The bill would give complete authority over the practice of optometry, including surgery, to the Texas Optometry Board. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4325 – Rep. JD Sheffield, DO (R-Gatesville) – The bill would direct the state of Texas to create a searchable database of the glaucoma co-management registry law that currently requires optometrists to collaborate with an ophthalmologist to manage glaucoma. The subcommittee held a hearing on it, but it was not voted out of committee.


Allied Health Providers – Physical Therapists

HB 29 – Rep. Ina Minjarez (D-San Antonio) and SB 732 – Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola) – The agreed-to version by stakeholders will: give PTs with a residency or fellowship 15 business days of direct access, 10 business days of direct access to all other PTs, and the requirement of a patient disclosure signed indicating that PTs cannot offer a physician’s diagnosis, imaging may not be used, and insurance may not pay for it. The bill was signed into law.

HB 4005 – Rep. Stephanie Klick (R-Fort Worth) – The bill would add physical therapists to the list of providers who may certify an individual’s eligibility for license plates or parking placards to persons with disabilities. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.


Allied Health Providers – Podiatry

HB 2853 – Rep. Craig Goldman (R-Fort Worth) – The bill would define what constitutes an “expert witness” for the purpose of investigations at the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR) regarding complaints against podiatrists. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 1533 – Sen. Jose Menendez (D-San Antonio) and HB 2593 – Rep. Garnet Coleman (D-Houston) – The bill would transfer regulation regarding a podiatric medical assistant to the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR), which is where the podiatrists are regulated. The bill also relates to the ability of podiatric medical assistants to perform imaging. HB 2593 was amended to another bill related to the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation.


Commercial Insurance – Network

HB 1742 – Rep. John Smithee (R-Amarillo) and SB 1914 – Sen. Nathan Johnson (D-Dallas) – The bill would add new mediation requirements for out-of-network labs if the enrollee did not have a “reasonable opportunity” to inquire about the laboratory’s network status. HB 1742 was vetoed due to the fact that it was covered by SB 1264.

SB 1264 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-North Richland Hills) – SB 1264 now serves as the main vehicle for a potential out-of-network overhaul (HB 3933, HB 2967, and SB 1591 were the previous bills). It would create a mediation process. SB 1264 was signed into law.

HB 3933 – Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio) – The bill is similar to SB 1264.

HB 2967 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) and SB 1591 – Sen. John Whitmire (D-Houston) – The bill would ban balance billing for out-of-network services. In return, a provider would submit its charge to the health plan for payment. The health plan would have the opportunity to take the charge to arbitration. The arbitrator would be directed to use the 80th percentile of FAIR Health as one of the factors to determine the final payment. HB 2967/SB 1591 is now SB 1264.

SB 1530 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-North Richland Hills) and HB 3299 – Rep. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) – The bill would allow self-funded plans to opt into Texas’ mediation process for balance bills. SB 1530 cleared the Senate, but it stalled in the House.

HB 3828 – Rep. Carl Sherman (D-Dallas) – For scheduled services, the bill would require HMOs to disclose the network status of any “facility-based physicians” who would be helping to provide the service and an estimate of the cost to the patient. In addition, the physician who is leading the service would be required to provide a statement to the patient indicating that any other physicians involved in the service, such as an anesthesiologist, may not be in the network. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4351 – Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio) – The bill would prohibit a health plan from requiring prior authorization of emergency care. In addition, the bill would require a board-certified physician licensed in Texas to complete a retrospective review of emergency care. “Before a health benefit plan issuer retrospectively denies coverage for emergency care based on the determination that it was not medically necessary or appropriate to provide the care as emergency care, the issuer or the utilization review agent acting on the issuer’s behalf shall review the enrollee’s medical record regarding the medical condition for which the emergency care was provided. If the issuer or agent requests a record relating to a retrospective review of emergency care, the health care provider who provided the emergency care shall submit the record of the emergency care to the issuer or agent in accordance with Section 4201.305.” The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4444 – Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio) – The bill would allow the attorney general to prosecute providers who balance bill a patient for $500 or more for services related to out-of-network emergency care. This would not apply to balance bills in the amount of $500 or less. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4536 – Rep. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) – The bill would direct the Texas Department of Insurance to create standards for determining a UCR. The bill suggests that TDI should consider a clearinghouse, which would be FAIR Health. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 2252 – Sen. Donna Campbell, MD (R-New Braunfels) – The bill would direct TDI to examine insurers’ network quality and adequacy. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 3178 – Rep. Rhetta Bowers (D-Garland) – The bill would direct the Texas House to conduct an interim study regarding retrospective denial by health benefit claims for emergency care. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a vote.


Commercial Insurance – Out of Network

HB 1742 – Rep. John Smithee (R-Amarillo) and SB 1914 – Sen. Nathan Johnson (D-Dallas) – The bill would add new mediation requirements for out-of-network labs if the enrollee did not have a “reasonable opportunity” to inquire about the laboratory’s network status. HB 1742 was vetoed due to the fact that it was covered by SB 1264.

SB 1264 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-North Richland Hills) – SB 1264 now serves as the main vehicle for a potential out-of-network overhaul (HB 3933, HB 2967, and SB 1591 were the previous bills). It would create a mediation process. SB 1264 was signed into law.

HB 3933 – Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio) – The bill is similar to SB 1264.

HB 2967 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) and SB 1591 – Sen. John Whitmire (D-Houston) – The bill would ban balance billing for out-of-network services. In return, a provider would submit its charge to the health plan for payment. The health plan would have the opportunity to take the charge to arbitration. The arbitrator would be directed to use the 80th percentile of FAIR Health as one of the factors to determine the final payment. HB 2967/SB 1591 is now SB 1264.

SB 1530 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-North Richland Hills) and HB 3299 – Rep. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) – The bill would allow self-funded plans to opt into Texas’ mediation process for balance bills. SB 1530 cleared the Senate, but it stalled in the House.

HB 3828 – Rep. Carl Sherman (D-Dallas) – For scheduled services, the bill would require HMOs to disclose the network status of any “facility-based physicians” who would be helping to provide the service and an estimate of the cost to the patient. In addition, the physician who is leading the service would be required to provide a statement to the patient indicating that any other physicians involved in the service, such as an anesthesiologist, may not be in the network. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4351 – Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio) – The bill would prohibit a health plan from requiring prior authorization of emergency care. In addition, the bill would require a board-certified physician licensed in Texas to complete a retrospective review of emergency care. “Before a health benefit plan issuer retrospectively denies coverage for emergency care based on the determination that it was not medically necessary or appropriate to provide the care as emergency care, the issuer or the utilization review agent acting on the issuer’s behalf shall review the enrollee’s medical record regarding the medical condition for which the emergency care was provided. If the issuer or agent requests a record relating to a retrospective review of emergency care, the health care provider who provided the emergency care shall submit the record of the emergency care to the issuer or agent in accordance with Section 4201.305.” The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4444 – Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio) – The bill would allow the attorney general to prosecute providers who balance bill a patient for $500 or more for services related to out-of-network emergency care. This would not apply to balance bills in the amount of $500 or less. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4536 – Rep. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) – The bill would direct the Texas Department of Insurance to create standards for determining a UCR. The bill suggests that TDI should consider a clearinghouse, which would be FAIR Health. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 2252 – Sen. Donna Campbell, MD (R-New Braunfels) – The bill would direct TDI to examine insurers’ network quality and adequacy. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 3178 – Rep. Rhetta Bowers (D-Garland) – The bill would direct the Texas House to conduct an interim study regarding retrospective denial by health benefit claims for emergency care. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a vote.


Commercial Insurance – State Health Plans

HB 2525 – Rep. Dustin Burrows (R-Lubbock) – The bill would allow insureds of state employee health plans to be provided average “prices” for services and to shop the service around. The insured would have the opportunity to “pocket” part of the savings. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a vote.

SB 1359 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-North Richland Hills) and HB 2097 – Rep. Matt Krause (R-Fort Worth) – The bill would create a pilot program that would allow a school district in Tarrant County to withdraw from TRS to create its own health care program. HB 2097 was heard in committee, but it did not receive a vote.

HB 2985 – Rep. Stephanie Klick (R-Fort Worth) – The bill would create a pilot program for ERS to administer an outpatient clinic. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 1695 – Sen. Nathan Johnson (D-Dallas) and HB 2032 – Rep. John Turner (D-Dallas) – The bill would create a health literacy advisory committee and health literacy in the state health plan. HB 2032 passed out of the House, but it did not move in the Senate.


Facilities – Freestanding Emergency Care Centers

HB 1112 – Rep. Sarah Davis (R-Houston) – The bill would require freestanding emergency medical centers that have closed to immediately remove their emergency signs. The bill was signed into law.

HB 1278 – Rep. James White (R-Hillister) – The bill would allow freestanding emergency medical centers to perform outpatient services. The bill was voted out of committee, but it was not set for a House floor vote.

SB 850 – Sen. Nathan Johnson (D-Dallas) – The bill would direct HHSC to conduct a study that examines the impact of freestanding emergency medical centers on traditional hospital emergency departments, rural health care, and other segments of the health care industry. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 866 – Sen. Kirk Watson (D-Austin) and HB 1941 – Rep. Dade Phelan (R-Beaumont) – The bill relates to the “unconscionable prices” charges by freestanding emergency medical centers if they charge more than 200 percent of the UCR.. It is being supported by members of the FEMC community. HB 1941 was signed into law.

SB 1054 – Sen. Jose Menendez (D-San Antonio) and HB 4404 – Rep. Rick Miller (R-Sugar Land) – The bill would prohibit health plans from discouraging an insured from using a freestanding emergency medical center. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 2041 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) – The bill would add additional disclosure patient requirements relating to insurance for freestanding emergency medical centers. The bill was signed into law.

SB 1549 – Sen. Charles Schwertner, MD (R-Georgetown) – The bill would allow the attorney general to prosecute freestanding emergency medical centers that charge an “unconscionable price,” which would be defined as 150 percent of the average charges according to the state’s data. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.


Facilities – Hospitals & ASCs

SB 199 – Sen. Charles Schwertner, MD (R-Georgetown) and SB 1085 – Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) – The bill would create a number of enforcement issues related to hospitals, including a requirement for 10 percent of the hospitals to be inspected every year and a perpetual care fee provision of $5 million at all times. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 384 – Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Lewisville) – The bill relates to the reporting of HAIs and preventable adverse events at health care facilities. The bill was signed into law.

HB 2086 – Rep. Jay Dean (R-Longview) – The bill would require pharmacies and health care facilities to establish a controlled substance disposal program. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 749 – Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) and HB 3269 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would establish a process through which a hospital may appeal to an independent third party regarding the level of care designation assigned to the hospital. This primarily relates to neonatal and maternal care. SB 749 was signed into law.

SB 1159 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-North Richland Hills) and HB 2929 – Rep. Jeff Leach (R-Plano) – The bill relates to hospital liens. “For purposes of this chapter, an injured individual is considered admitted to a hospital if the individual is allowed access to any department of the hospital for the provision of any treatment, care, or service to the individual.” HB 2929 was signed into law.

HB 2927 – Rep. Jeff Leach (R-Plano) – The bill relates to hospital liens. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 1444 – Sen. Charles Perry (R-Lubbock) and HB 3934 – Rep. James Frank (R-Wichita Falls) – The bill would allow rural hospitals to establish a health care collaborative. HB 3934 was signed into law.

HB 871 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would a hospital located in a county with a population of 30,000 or less to satisfy a Level IV trauma facility designation relating to physicians through the use of telemedicine. The bill was signed into law.

SB 1482 – Sen. Chuy Hinojosa (D-McAllen) – The bill would direct DSHS to post trauma response revenue code data collected on its website. The posted data would be required to include information for the entire state, each public health region, and each hospital. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 1621 – Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) – The bill would create a license for a “limited services rural hospital” in a rural area. This would be pending approval by Medicare. The bill was signed into law.

HB 3468 – Rep. Mary Gonzalez (D-El Paso) – The bill would create a “timeshare” ASC within an ASC in which multiple ASCs could operate in the same building (on different days). Every ASC operating within the building would be liable for a licensing violation by any of the other ASCs. The bill was set for a committee hearing, but the author pulled the committee hearing request.

SB 1529 – Sen. Charles Perry (R-Lubbock) and HB 3301 – Rep. Drew Darby (R-San Angelo) – The bill would give the state the authority to approve hospital mergers (as opposed to the federal government). This issue relates to a San Angelo hospital merger. HB 3301 was signed into law.

HB 4036 – Rep. Alex Dominguez (D-Brownsville) – The bill would require facilities to include a billing statement for consumers to include: an itemized list of each service, an itemized list of each supply, and a list of the physician and other clinicians who provided a service. A patient would not be liable for any billed charges that violate the section. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a committee vote.

SB 170 – Sen. Charles Perry (R-Lubbock) and HB 2035 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would reinforce and clarify into state statute the longstanding policy and practice in Texas to pay rural hospitals their actual and documented cost to treat Medicaid patients. SB 170 was signed into law.


Hospitals: Local Provider Participation Funds (LPPFs)

SB 1099 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) and HB 1142 – Rep. Stan Lambert (R-Abilene) – The bill would create a local provider participation funds (LPPF) hospital program in Taylor County. HB 1142 was signed into law.

SB 1060 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-North Richland Hills) and HB 2326 – Rep. Morgan Meyer (R-Dallas) – The bill would continue the LPPF hospital program in Dallas County. HB 2326 was signed into law.

SB 1061 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-North Richland Hills) and HB 2324 – Rep. Charlie Geren (R-Fort Worth) – The bill would continue the LPPF hospital program in Tarrant County. HB 2324 was signed into law.

SB 1545 – Sen. Jose Menendez (D-San Antonio) and HB 3896 – Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio) – The bill would create an LPPF in the San Antonio area. SB 1545 was signed into law.

SB 1350 – Sen. Kirk Watson (D-Austin) and HB 3649 – Rep. Gina Hinojosa (D-Austin) – The bill would create an LPPF in the Austin area. SB 1350 was signed into law.

SB 1751 – Sen. Jose Rodriguez (D-El Paso) and HB 3640 – Rep. Joe Moody (D-El Paso) – The bill would create an LPPF in El Paso. SB 1751 was signed into law.

HB 3679 – Rep. James Frank (R-Wichita Falls) and SB 2286 – Sen. Pat Fallon (R-Frisco) – The bill would create an LPPF in Wichita Falls. SB 2286 was signed into law.

SB 2022 – Sen. Boris Miles (D-Houston) and HB 3459 – Rep. Garnet Coleman (D-Houston) – The bill would create an LPPF for Harris County. HB 3459 was signed into law by the governor.

SB 2028 – Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Tyler) and HB 3833 – Rep. Jay Dean (R-Longview) – The bill would address the LPPF for the Tyler area and hospitals that are not located in the county. The bills have not witnessed movement.

HB 4289 – Rep. Garnet Coleman (D-Houston) and SB 2256 – Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) – The bill would add allow local governments that are not part of hospital districts to mandate LPPFs. HB 4289 was signed into law.

HB 4548 – Rep. John Wray (R-Waxahachie) and SB 2423 – Sen. Brian Birdwell (R-Granbury) – The bill would create an LPPF for Ellis County. The bill also included an amendment to create an LPPF for Wichita Falls. HB 4548 was signed into law.

SB 2257 – Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) – The bill would allow entities to create LPPFs in counties that are not served by a hospital district or a public hospital. The bill did not receive a hearing.

SB 2315 – Sen. Chuy Hinojosa (D-McAllen) – The bill would create an LPPF in Nueces County. The bill was signed into law.

HB 4648 – Rep. Dustin Burrows (R-Lubbock) and SB 2448 – Sen. Charles Perry (R-Lubbock) – The bill would create an LPPF for Lubbock County. SB 2448 was signed into law.

HB 651 – Rep. Drew Springer (R-Muenster) – The bill would create an omnibus LPPF bill that would allow counties without existing programs to create LPPFs. The bill was vetoed.


Medical Lawsuits

HB 765 – Rep. Gene Wu (D-Houston) – The bill would tie non-economic damages awarded in health lawsuits to the consumer price index. The bill received a committee hearing, but it did not receive a committee vote.

HB 2362 – Rep. Joe Moody (D-El Paso) and Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) and SB 2378 – Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola) – The bill relates to the standard of proof in health care liability claims involving emergency care. It would address the following scenarios:

  1. When the patient arrives in either the hospital’s emergency department or obstetrical unit in stable condition regardless of whether the patient later suffers an emergency.
  2. When the patient has been stabilized or is capable of receiving non-emergency treatment even if the patient later suffers an emergency.
  3. If any part of the patient’s emergency is in any way caused by a provider.

Stakeholders reached an agreement. HB 2362 was signed into law.

SB 1215 – Sen. Charles Schwertner, MD (R-Georgetown) and HB 3832 – Rep. Reggie Smith (R-Sherman) – The bill relates to the recovery of medical or health care expenses in civil actions. “The trier of fact shall consider a claimant’s failure to seek reimbursement for medical or health care expenses that are obligated to be paid on the claimant’s behalf a failure to mitigate the claimant’s damages.” The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 1565 – Sen. Pat Fallon (R-Frisco) and HB 3248 – Rep. Reggie Smith (R-Sherman) – The bill relates to patient information that may be excluded from a health care claim. SB 1565 was signed into law.

SB 1189 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) and HB 2251 – Rep. Givoanni Capriglione (R-Southlake) – The bill addresses deceptive “bad drug” television advertisements. “Advertising by attorneys is ubiquitous, sometimes misleading, and often inflammatory. The bill advocates for a new law that will have four basic elements: (1) advertising for legal services must disclose that it is a paid ad, the sponsor of the ad and whether the attorney will actually represent the client, among other things; (2) the attorney may not use “medical alert,” “health alert,” “consumer alert,” “public service announcement,” or similar term, or say a product has been recalled when it has not; (3) advertisements for plaintiffs to file medicine-related lawsuits must advise that people receiving the ad should not stop taking their medicine; and (4) the AG or local prosecuting attorneys may seek an injunction and civil penalties.” SB 1189 was signed into law.


Patient Bad Debt

HB 2732 – Rep. Dustin Burrows (R-Lubbock) – H.B. 2732 prohibits a consumer reporting agency from furnishing a consumer report containing information related to an applicable unpaid debt for nonemergency medical care unless the reporting of that debt complies with the bill’s provisions. The bill excludes violations of its provisions from the actions classified as false, misleading, or deceptive acts or practices under the Deceptive Trade Practices-Consumer Protection Act and exempts such violations from provisions authorizing the attorney general to file suit for injunctive relief or a civil penalty against a person who violates statutory provisions relating to the regulation of consumer credit reporting agencies. The bill was voted out of committee, but it was not set on the House floor for a vote.


Pharmacy Issues

HB 460 – Rep. Matt Shaheen (R-Plano) – The bill relates to physicians dispensing “dangerous drugs.” The bill did not receive a vote after a committee hearing.

HB 698 – Rep. Cesar Blanco (D-El Paso) – The bill relates to pharmacist gag clauses, which prohibit pharmacists from informing patients about lower cost options. Congressman Michael Burgess passed a federal ban on pharmacist gag clauses in 2018. The bill was voted out of committee, but it did not receive a vote in the full House.

HB 1622 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) – The bill would allow physicians to dispense drugs. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a committee vote.

SB 1056 – Sen. Judith Zaffirini (D-Laredo) – Clarifies that a physician’s delegation to a pharmacist for implementation of a patient’s drug therapy under a protocol must follow a diagnosis, initial patient assessment, and drug therapy order by the physician; • Requires the pharmacist to maintain a copy of the protocol for inspection until the seventh anniversary of the expiration date of the protocol. Signed into law.

HB 3703 – Rep. Stephanie Klick (R-Fort Worth) • Expands the current compassionate use program to include more medical conditions for which a physician can prescribe low-THC cannabis to a patient. • Changes the qualifications for a prescribing physician to correspond with the expansion of authorized medical conditions for treatment. • Requires the Department of State Health Services to adopt rules by December 1, 2019, designating incurable neurodegenerative diseases for which patients may be prescribed low THC cannabis. Signed into law.

HB 2099 – Rep. Stan Lambert (R-Abilene) and SB 580 – Sen. Donna Cambell, MD (R-New Braunfels) – The bill relates to the modification of physician prescriptions by health plans through step therapy. HB 2099 passed out of the House, but it did not move in the Senate.

HB 2425 – Rep. Kyle Kacal (R-College Station) – The bill would allow physicians to delegate certain authorities to pharmacists who are working in FQHCs. The bill was signed into law.

HB 2536 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) – The bill would require drug manufacturers to submit a report to HHSC when an individual drug’s price increases by 40 percent over three years (or 15 percent in a single year). The bill was signed into law.

HB 1264 – Rep. Senfronia Thompson (D-Houston) and SB 759 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) – The bill relates to pharmacist communications to prescribing practitioners regarding certain dispensed biological products. HB 1264 was signed into law.

HB 1668 – Rep. Steve Allison (R-San Antonio) and SB 683 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) – The bill would create several necessary changes needed to update inconsistencies in the pharmacy act related to controlled substances, including provisions for pharmacies that do not dispense Schedule II drugs for seven days and to create a Class E pharmacy license or nonresident pharmacy license to an out-of-state pharmacy whose primary business is to process a prescription drug order for a patient. SB 683 was signed into law.

HB 2817 – Rep. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) and SB 846 – Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola) – The bill addresses “unfair competition” from PBMs by allowing patients to choose how their medications are delivered, prohibiting PBMs from retroactively reducing payments after a claim is adjudicated, and forbid PBMs from paying their own pharmacies at a rate that is higher than what they reimburse their network pharmacies. HB 2817 was passed out of the House, but it did not pass the Senate.

HB 4297 – Rep. John Raney (R-College Station) and SB 1056 – Sen. Judith Zaffirini (D-Laredo) – HB 4297 amends the Occupations Code to include among the conditions under which a delegation by a physician to a properly qualified and trained pharmacist acting under adequate physician supervision of the performance of specific acts of drug therapy management may include the implementation or modification of a patient’s drug therapy under a protocol that the delegation follows a diagnosis, initial patient assessment, and drug therapy order by the physician and that the pharmacist maintains a copy of a protocol for inspection until at least the seventh anniversary of the expiration date of the protocol. The bill requires the Texas State Board of Pharmacy, not later than December 1, 2019, to adopt rules necessary to implement statutory provisions relating to rulemaking for the implementation of drug therapy under a protocol. HB 2425 by Rep. Kyle Kacal (R-College Station) is similar. SB 1056 was signed into law.

HB 2482 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill relates to financial investor disclosure statements for certain pharmacies. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 3052 – Rep. Jay Dean (R-Longview) – The bill relates to the revocation of a pharmacy license for failure to operate as a pharmacy for 30 days. The bill received a committee vote, but the House Calendars Committee did not set it for a full House vote.

HB 3458 – Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston) – The bill relates to the administration of an immunization by a pharmacist. The bill received a subcommittee hearing, but it did not receive a committee vote.

SB 2049 – Sen. Charles Schwertner, MD (R-Georgetown) and SB 2349 – Sen. Donna Campbell, MD (R-New Braunfels) and HB 1757 – Rep. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) – The bill relates to the authority of an insured to select a pharmacist under the insured’s health insurance policy and recognize pharmacists as “providers” in the health insurance code. HB 1757 was signed into law.

HB 4285 – Rep. Bill Zedler (R-Arlington) and SB 835 – Sen. Boris Miles (D-Houston) – The bill would allow pharmacists to administer certain drugs and vaccinations. The bill was heard in a subcommittee, but it did not receive a committee vote.

HB 2231 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) and SB 2261 – Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) – The bill would require the Texas Department of Insurance to establish a complaint resolution program relating to the reimbursement practices of PBMs. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a committee vote.


Physician Licensing

HB 602 – Rep. Bill Zedler (R-Arlington) – The bill relates to the Texas Medical Board’s submissions to the National Practitioner Data Bank. The bill cleared a House committee, but it did not make it to the full House for a vote.

HB 604 – Rep. Bill Zedler (R-Arlington) – The bill relates to the release of confidential physician-patient communications to the Texas Medical Board. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a vote.

HB 2059 – Rep. Cesar Blanco (D-El Paso) – Starting Sept. 1, 2020, requires all health care professionals whose practice includes direct patient care to complete a course on identifying and assisting victims of human trafficking as a criteria for license renewal. • Requires the Health & Human Services Commission to approve and post the training courses. • For physicians, TMB must designate the course as a medical ethics or professional responsibility course. Signed into law.

HB 1899 – Rep. Greg Bonnen, MD (R-Friendswood) – Requires a licensing authority (including TMB) to immediately revoke a license on notification or deny an application for a health care professional license (including a physician) for an applicant who: 1) is required to register as a sex offender; 2) has been previously convicted of or placed on deferred adjudication community supervision for the commission of a felony offense involving the use or threat of force; or 3) has been previously convicted of or placed on deferred adjudication community supervision for the commission of sexual assault, aggravated assault, aggravated sexual assault, or injury to a child, elderly individual, or disabled individual, in which the victim of the offense was a patient of the applicant and that was committed: a) when the applicant held a health care professional license in Texas or another state; and b) in the course of providing services within the scope of the applicant’s license. Signed into law.

HB 1504 – Rep. Chris Paddie (R-Marshall) – Continues the Texas Medical Board until 2031. • Authorizes a physician to receive a non-disciplinary remedial plan every five years instead of once per lifetime. • Requires TMB to remove remedial plan information from a physician’s public profile unless it’s related to the delivery of health care or more than one was issued for the same violation. • For all formal complaints filed at SOAH, requires removal of the complaint and any prior disciplinary action related to the complaint, from a physician’s public profile within 10 days after TMB issues a final order resolving the formal complaint. • When formal complaints are initially filed at SOAH, a physician’s public profile must be updated to include a copy of the complaint within 10 days of filing at SOAH. • Authorizes an expedited licensing process, and makes changes to licensing exam requirements, for certain out-of-state applicants. • Creates a new license type for radiology assistants. Signed into law.

HB 607 – Rep. Shawn Thierry (D-Houston) – The bill would pediatricians and OB/GYNs to complete continuing medical education in cultural competence and implicit bias. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 1353 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) and SB 752 – Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston) – The bill would provide civil liability immunity to a physician who provides care in connection with a man-made or natural disaster. SB 752 was signed into law.

HB 1532 – Rep. Morgan Meyer (R-Dallas) – The bill would create whistleblower protections to “employed physicians” in relation to the non-profit health corporations for which they work. A similar bill failed in 2017. SB 1985 by Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola) is similar to HB 1532. HB 1532 was signed into law.

SB 1142 – Sen. Kirk Watson (D-Austin) and HB 2976 – Rep. Donna Howard (D-Austin) – The bill would give the Travis County Healthcare District the ability to directly employ physicians. Since Travis County does not directly operate the healthcare district like Dallas and Harris counties, an exception for the county to employ physicians was required. SB 1142 was signed into law.

SB 1107 – Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) and HB 2892 – Rep. Tom Oliverson, MD (R-Spring) – The bill relates to the right of conscientious refusal of a health care service. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 1084 – Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) and HB 1065 – Rep. Trent Ashby (R-Lufkin) – The bill would create a rural resident physician grant program. HB 1065 was signed into law.

HB 1874 – Rep. Sarah Davis (R-Houston) – The bill relates to a regenerative medicine registry established by the Texas Regenerative Medicine Coordinating Board. The bill cleared a House committee, but it was not set for a full House floor vote.

HB 1504 – Rep. Chris Paddie (R-Marshall) and SB 610 – Sen. Robert Nichols (R-Jacksonville) – The bill serves as the vehicle for the Texas Medical Board’s “sunset” bill. A number of germane issues could be added to this bill. The bill was signed into law.

HB 1899 – Rep. Greg Bonnen, MD (R-Friendswood) – Concerns have been raised regarding the prevalence of licensed health care professionals using their privilege and position of authority to commit crimes against vulnerable patients. It has been suggested that one way to prevent these horrific crimes is to make individuals who have committed certain crimes, including registered sex offenders, ineligible for health care professional licenses and to implement a standard procedure for notification of appropriate agencies. HB 1899 was signed into law.

HB 3150 – Rep. Richard Raymond (D-Laredo) – The bill relates to the regulation of hyperbaric medical treatment at a physician’s office and would require an occupational certificate. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 3463 – Rep. John Frullo (R-Lubbock) and SB 1690 – Sen. Charles Perry (R-Lubbock) – The bill relates to the authority of the Lubbock County Hospital District to employ physicians. HB 3463 was signed into law.

HB 3519 – Rep. Steve Allison (R-San Antonio) – The bill would amend the state’s privacy laws to allow an exception for situations in which the health or safety of a person or the public was in jeopardy. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4215 – Rep. Greg Bonnen, MD (R-Friendswood) and SB 1882 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) – The bill would build on the 2017 maintenance of certification law by indicating that a hospital is violating the law if the hospital does not provide a written notice of the proposal to hold an election. Both bills stalled.

HB 4312 – Rep. JD Sheffield, DO (R-Gatesville) – The bill would put in statute that the following acts constitute the practice of medicine and may not be delegated by a physician: reading or interpreting a radiological study and rendering a diagnosis based on a radiological study. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 4330 – Rep. Giovanni Capriglione (R-Southlake) – The bill would require physicians who have employment or consulting agreements with commercial health insurance plans to disclose those relationships to the state of Texas through the attorney general. The attorney general would have the ability to levy civil penalties for non compliance. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.


Prescription Monitoring Program & Controlled Substances

HB 577 – Rep. Senfronia Thompson (D-Houston) and SB 420 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) – A pharmacist would not be required to check the PMP for a refill under this proposal. SB 420 passed out of the Senate, but did not make it out of the House.

HB 1291 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) and SB 437 – Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Lewisville) – The bill would prohibit life insurance companies from discriminating against a consumer based on an individual’s prescription for or obtainment of an opioid antagonist. SB 437 was signed into law.

HB 1293 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) and SB 435 – Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Lewisville) – The bill would direct school health advisory councils to make recommendations to districts on instruction regarding opioid abuse, addiction, and methods of administering opioid antagonists. SB 435 was signed into law.

HB 1710 – Rep. Ana-Maria Ramos (D-Richardson) – The bill would require a prescriber to provide disclosures to patients relating to the risk of addiction and overdose for the prescription of Schedule II controlled substances. The bill passed out of the House, but it did not witness movement in the Senate.

HB 1866 – Rep. Yvonne Davis (D-Dallas) – The bill is being pushed by the chiropractor lobby and would “suggest” that physicians rely on chiropractic treatment or physical therapy before prescribing an opioid. It would also create limits on opioids, and the limits would include exceptions for surgery. The bill was passed out of committee, but it did not make it out of the House.

SB 813 – Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas) – The bill would limit the prescription of an “opioid” to seven days for acute pain. The bill would allow a prescriber to use his or her medical judgment to prescribe for more than seven days. However, the prescriber would be required to document the need in the patient’s medical record. In addition, the bill would require prescribers to disclose the risks associated with “opioids.” The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 2085 – Rep. Jay Dean (R-Longview) – The bill would allow a parent, guardian, or other individual affect an opioid directive. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 2086 – Rep. Jay Dean (R-Longview) and SB 2367 – Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola) – The bill would require pharmacies and health care facilities to establish a controlled substance disposal program. The bill did not receive a committee hearing after being held up by pharmacy groups.

HB 2087 – Rep. Jay Dean (R-Longview) – The bill would mandate electronic prescribing for Schedule II drugs beginning on September 1, 2019. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 2088 – Rep. Jay Dean (R-Longview) – The bill would require pharmacists to provide patients with a list of safe drug drop-off sites. The bill was signed into law.

HB 2174 – Rep. John Zerwas, MD (R-Richmond) and SB 1233 – Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) – The bills have been endorsed by the Attorney General and would: limit Schedule II prescriptions for acute injuries and surgeries to 10 days, mandate physicians to complete CME training for pain medications, and mandate electronic prescribing for Schedule II prescriptions beginning on January 1, 2019. A House amendment by Rep. JD Sheffield, DO would direct the Texas Health and Human Services Commission to pay for opioid abuse treatment programs under the Medicaid program. HB 2174 was signed into law.

HB 2454 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would mandate two hours of CME for pain management every year. The bill was signed into law.

HB 2250 – Rep. Eddie Lucio, III (D-Brownsville) and SB 1308 – The bill would allow APRNs and PAs to prescribe Schedule II drugs under physician delegation. HB 2250 did not get placed on the House’s calendar for a full House vote.

SB 1112 – Sen. Eddie Lucio, II (D-Brownsville) – The bill would create a study regarding opioid overdoses in the state. The bill did not receive a hearing.

HB 3285 – Rep. JD Sheffield, DO (R-Gatesville) – The bill would establish an “opioid awareness” campaign for the state of Texas that would include an opioid misuse public awareness campaign, an opioid antagonist program, continuing education, and a work group to advise the state. The bill was signed into law.

HB 3284 – Rep. JD Sheffield, DO (R-Gatesville) – The bill was amended to delay the state’s mandate to check the prescription monitoring program until March 1, 2020. In addition, an amendment will create an advisory board for the PMP. The bill was signed into law.

HB 536 – Rep. Shawn Thierry (D-Houston) – The bill would require opioids to be dispensed in a bottle with a red cap or container with a red label. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 562 – Rep. Shawn Thierry (D-Houston) – The bill would prohibit a pharmacist from dispensing opioids without a warning label reading: WARNING: THIS DRUG IS AN OPIOID. THE USE OF AN OPIOID MAY RESULT IN ADDICTION TO OPIOIDS AND DEATH. The bill did not receive a full House vote.

HB 563 – Rep. Shawn Thierry (D-Houston) – The bill would prohibit a pharmacist from dispensing an opioid without obtaining a signed acknowledgement form from the patient about the risks of opioid addiction. The pharmacy board would be required to adopt an acknowledgement form that includes language in 14-point font that is similar to: “WARNING: THIS DRUG IS AN OPIOID. THE USE OF AN OPIOID MAY RESULT IN ADDICTION TO OPIOIDS AND DEATH.” The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 2811 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would set standards of care for treating patients with acute care, which would be defined as being due to trauma, disease, or surgery. It would set standards for how a physician should evaluate a patient’s pain, would require a treatment plan, and would require a periodic review of the treatment. In addition, it would include an informed consent process. The bill passed out of the House, but it did not receive a committee vote in the Senate.

HB 4508 – Rep. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) – The bill would exempt CBD oil from the Texas Controlled Substances Act. The bill was voted out of committee. However, it was not placed on the House floor for a full House vote.

HB 4145 – Rep. Erin Zwiener (D-Driftwood) – The bill would prohibit a clinician from prescribing a controlled substance for pain simply due to the fact that a cannabidiol was detected in the patient’s body. The bill was not voted out of committee after a committee hearing.

HB 3826 – Rep. Julie Johnson (D-Dallas) – The bill would allow some medical marijuana. The bill did not receive a committee vote.

HB 3538 – Rep. Toni Rose (D-Dallas) – The bill would establish the Opioid and Substance Abuse Advisory Council. The bill was voted out of committee. However, it was not placed on the House floor for a vote.

SB 2316 – Sen. Chuy Hinojosa (D-McAllen) – The bill would create new standards related to the prescription monitoring program (PMP). It would delay the mandate to check the PMP from 09.01.19 to 03.01.20. In addition, it would create a PMP advisory committee and provide additional protections to prescribers. The bill passed out of the Senate, but it did not move out of the House.


Pricing Transparency

HB 3862 – Rep. Dwayne Bohac (R-Houston) – The bill would require hospitals to disclose the hospital’s cash price for each service regularly provided by the hospital. The price must be listed on the hospital’s website. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a committee vote.

HB 4137 – Rep. Ceilia Israel (D-Austin) – The bill would require physicians to post a conspicuous notice of a patient’s right to receive an estimate of charges. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a committee vote.

HB 2525 – Rep. Dustin Burrows (R-Lubbock) – The bill would require the state’s health plans – ERS and TRS – to create a hotline for insureds to compare prices of participating providers. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a committee vote.

HB 2785 – Rep. Dustin Burrows (R-Lubbock) – The bill would require certain hospitals (owned by the state or a subdivision) that discount a billed charge for a health care service for a patient who pays cash to notify patients of the discounted price of the service. The bill was heard in committee, but it did not receive a vote.


Public Health

HB 2134 – Rep. Stephanie Klick (R-Fort Worth) – The bill would add orthopaedic surgeons to the list of specialists who must be consulted for suspected child abuse and neglect related to certain musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. It would allow a parent to request a specialist. The bill was voted out of committee, but it was not set for a vote on the House floor.

HB 3148 – Rep. Tan Parker (R-Flower Mound) – Effective September 1, 2027, requires the Department of State Health Services to establish and maintain an investigational stem cell registry. • Changes the affiliation/accreditation criteria for the institutional review boards (IRBs) that oversee investigational stem cell treatments. • Clarifies that a governmental entity is prohibited from interfering with the use of an authorized investigational stem cell treatment unless the treatment uses an adult stem cell product that is considered an adulterated or misbranded drug. • The bill adds clarifying language that: 1) state law doesn’t prohibit a physician from using adult stem cells for their intended homologous use if the stem cells are: a) produced by a manufacturer registered by the FDA and b) commercially available; and 2) state law doesn’t require an IRB to oversee treatment using adult stem cells registered by the FDA for their intended homologous use. Signed into law.


Sports Medicine

HB 76 – Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Houston) – HB 76 was amended from its original form in which it would mandate cardiac screenings for student athletes to an information program. The bill was signed into law.

HB 201 – Rep. Phil Stephenson (R-Wharton) – The bill would direct the combative sports advisory board to include a chiropractor. The bill passed out of the House, but it did not receive consideration in the Senate.

HB 960 – Rep. Donna Howard (D-Austin) – The bill would add a school nurse to the list of individuals who may remove a student athlete from a practice or concussion due to a suspected concussion. The current law includes a coach as one of the individuals who may remove a patient. The bill was amended to HB 961.

HB 961 – Rep. Donna Howard (D-Austin) – The bill would add the school nurse to the concussion oversight team. If the school nurse requests to be added, the nurse would be required to complete training. The bill was signed into law.

HB 2156 – Rep. Bobby Guerra (D-McAllen) – The Texas Medical Board approved a rule change in 2018 that would recognize out-of-state licenses for team physicians who travel with their teams to Texas. The legislation would put the regulation in statute and amend the regulation. HB 2299 is a similar bill. HB 2299 was signed into law.

HB 3128 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would add physician assistants and nurse practitioners who are working under a physician’s delegation and supervision to perform return-to-play protocol services for students who have been removed from interscholastic activity on the basis of a suspected concussion. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 3456 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would add physical therapists to the list of individuals who may remove athletes from the field due to a suspected concussion (coaches and parents already have that authority). The bill would also allow school districts to add non-physicians to the list of health professionals who may serve on a concussion oversight team. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.


Telemedicine

HB 871 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would a hospital located in a county with a population of 30,000 or less to satisfy a Level IV trauma facility designation relating to physicians through the use of telemedicine. The bill was signed into law.

HB 870 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) and SB 670 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) – The bill contains the same platform language as HB 3345 and affects the Medicaid program. SB 670 was signed into law.

HB 3345 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) and SB 1265 – Sen. Dawn Buckingham, MD (R-Lakeway) – The bill would add to the 2017 telemedicine law by mandating that a physician has the right to choose the telemedicine platform of her choice. HB 3345 was signed into law.


Trauma

HB 871 – Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo) – The bill would a hospital located in a county with a population of 30,000 or less to satisfy a Level IV trauma facility designation relating to physicians through the use of telemedicine. The bill passed out of the House and has a Senate committee hearing scheduled for 05.07.19.

SB 1149 – Sen. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) – The bill relates to an assessment and strategic review of the trauma hospital system by DSHS. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 1482 – Sen. Chuy Hinojosa (D-McAllen) – The bill would direct DSHS to post trauma response revenue code data collected on its website. The posted data would be required to include information for the entire state, each public health region, and each hospital. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.


Workers’ Comp

HB 387 – Rep. Phil Cortez (D-San Antonio) and SB 1022 – Sen. Brandon Creighton (R-The Woodlands) – The bill would allow physicians to delegate Workers’ Comp work status reports to advanced nurse practitioners. Physicians assistants gained this ability in the 2017 Legislature. HB 387 was signed into law.

HB 733 – Rep. Bill Zedler (R-Arlington) – H.B. 733 amends the Labor Code to remove as a condition rendering a doctor ineligible to directly or indirectly provide workers’ compensation health care services or directly or indirectly receive remuneration for such services that the doctor was not reinstated or restored by the division of workers’ compensation of the Texas Department of Insurance to the list of approved doctors before September 1, 2007. The bill establishes as a condition rendering a doctor ineligible that the doctor has not been reinstated or restored by the division to the list of approved doctors or to the workers’ compensation system.
The bill was voted out of a House committee, but it did not get set for a vote in the full House.

HB 741 – Rep. Yvonne Davis (D-Dallas) – The bill would require injured employees to be provided forms indicating that the “employee has the right to choose a treating doctor, including a doctor of medicine, osteopathic medicine, optometry, dentistry, podiatry, or chiropractic who is licensed and authorized to practice.” The bill is being pushed by the chiropractors’ lobby. HB 741 passed out of the House, but it did not receive consideration in the Senate.

HB 1005 – Rep. Nicole Collier (D-Fort Worth) – The bill would direct carriers to reimburse physicians for medical causation narrative reports (if the physician requests a payment). A similar effort failed in the 2017 Legislature. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

SB 935 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-DFW) – and HB 2207 – Rep. Hugh Shine (R-Temple) – The bill is in response to “surprise bills” for Workers’ Comp-related treatments at the San Antonio Military Medical Center. The legislation would create requirements for processing medical bills for services provided to an injured employee by a federal medical treatment center and create a separate medical dispute resolution process to resolve disputes over charges billed directly to an injured employee by a federal military treatment facility. SB 935 was signed into law.

SB 934 – Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-DFW) – The bill would extend the time period for a judicial review from 45 days to 60 days after the date on which the division mailed the party the decision of the appeals panel. The bill cleared the Senate, but it was held up in the House.

HB 4300 – Rep. Jim Murphy (R-Houston) – The bill would create a Medicare set-aside arrangement for Workers’ Comp. The bill did not receive a committee hearing.

HB 2919 – Rep. Hugh Shine (R-Temple) – The bill would create a demonstration program at the State Office of Risk Management for real-time processing of workers’ compensation authorizations of payment for medical services and medical bills. The bill was voted out of committee, but it was not set for a floor vote.